The path to more sustainable energy systems : how do we get there from here?

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Full title: The path to more sustainable energy systems : how do we get there from here? / Ben W. Ebenhack and Daniel M. Martínez.
Main author: Ebenhack, Ben W.
Corporate Authors: Ebook Central Academic Complete.
Other authors: Martínez, Daniel M.
Format: eBook           
Online access: Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central.


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020 |a 160650262X (electronic bk.) 
020 |a 9781606502600 (print) 
020 |a 1606502603 (print) 
024 7 |a 10.5643/9781606502624  |2 doi 
035 |a (OCoLC)844954581 
035 |a (CaBNvSL)swl00402448 
035 |a (MiAaPQ)EBC1273493 
035 |a (Au-PeEL)EBL1273493 
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035 |a (CaONFJC)MIL493386 
035 |a (OCoLC)853240468 
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050 4 |a TJ808  |b .E236 2013 
082 0 4 |a 333.794  |2 23 
100 1 |a Ebenhack, Ben W. 
245 1 4 |a The path to more sustainable energy systems :  |b how do we get there from here? /  |c Ben W. Ebenhack and Daniel M. Martínez. 
264 1 |a [New York, N.Y.] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) :  |b Momentum Press,  |c 2013. 
300 |a 1 electronic text (xiv, 192 pages) :  |b illustrations, digital file. 
336 |a text  |b txt  |2 rdacontent 
337 |a computer  |b c  |2 rdamedia 
338 |a online resource  |b cr  |2 rdacarrier 
347 |a data file  |2 rda 
500 |a Restrictions on access to electronic version: access available to SOAS staff and students only, using SOAS id and password. 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index. 
505 0 |a 1. Concepts, definitions, measures -- 1.1 Defining energy -- 1.1.1 Work -- 1.1.2 Heat -- 1.1.3 Light -- 1.1.4 Electricity -- 1.1.5 Power -- 1.1.6 Efficiency -- 1.2 Key energy resource definitions -- 1.2.1 Sources and resources -- 1.2.2 Reserves -- 1.2.3 Production -- 1.2.4 Comparing units and magnitudes of measure -- 1.3 "Renewable" versus "Nonrenewable" energy -- 1.3.1 Stock and flow limitations -- 1.3.2 Fossil and nuclear fuels: nonrenewable, stock-limited energy -- 1.3.3 Solar energy: renewable, flow-limited energy -- 1.3.4 In-between resources: renewable, stock, and flow-limited energy -- 1.3.5 Briefly comparing current use of energy stocks and flows -- 1.4 Energy use in societies -- 1.4.1 Visualizing energy use -- 1.4.2 Energy use by economic sector -- 1.4.3 Energy use by example: the united states -- 1.5 Environmental impacts of energy use -- 1.5.1 Classification by pollutant or harm -- 1.5.2 Classification by scale -- 1.6 Defining sustainability and sustainable energy -- 1.6.1 Sustainability -- 1.6.2 Sustainable energy -- 1.7 Sources of energy and environmental information -- 1.7.1 United States Energy Information Administration -- 1.7.2 International Energy Agency -- 1.7.3 World Energy Council -- 1.7.4 World Resources Institute -- 1.7.5 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change -- 1.7.6 Industry reports --  
505 8 |a 2. "Nonrenewable" energy resources -- 2.1 Fossil fuels -- 2.1.1 Oil and gas -- 2.1.2 Coal -- 2.2 Nuclear fuels -- 2.2.1 Fission -- 2.2.2 Fusion -- 2.2.3 Uranium distribution -- 2.2.4 Uranium exploration and production --  
505 8 |a 3. "Renewable" energy resources -- 3.1 A note -- 3.2 Earth's energy allowance -- 3.3 The solar resource -- 3.3.1 Solar photovoltaic technology -- 3.3.2 Concentrating solar power -- 3.3.3 Passive solar energy -- 3.3.4 Solar energy distribution and installed capacity -- 3.4 Biomass and biofuel resources -- 3.4.1 Ethanol -- 3.4.2 Biodiesel -- 3.4.3 Biogas -- 3.4.4 Biomass and biofuels distribution and production -- 3.5 Hydropower -- 3.5.1 Hydro potential distribution -- 3.5.2 Tidal and wave power -- 3.6 Wind power -- 3.6.1 Wind turbines -- 3.6.2 Wind distribution and installed capacity -- 3.7 Geothermal -- 3.7.1 Geothermal distribution and installed capacity -- 3.7.2 Direct use applications --  
505 8 |a 4. Energy consumption in economic sectors -- 4.1 Broadly characterizing energy consumption -- 4.2 Energy consumption in industrialized society -- 4.3 The electric power sector -- 4.3.1 Electricity generation -- 4.3.2 Electricity delivery -- 4.3.3 Energy consumption in the electric power sector -- 4.4 The transportation sector -- 4.4.1 Vehicular technology -- 4.4.2 Automobiles versus mass transit -- 4.4.3 Commercial transportation -- 4.4.4 Energy consumption in the transportation sector -- 4.5 The industrial sector -- 4.5.1 Petroleum refining -- 4.5.2 The steel and aluminum industries -- 4.5.3 Energy consumption in the industrial sector -- 4.6 The residential and commercial sectors -- 4.6.1 Lighting -- 4.6.2 Heating -- 4.6.3 Cooling -- 4.6.4 Appliances -- 4.6.5 Consumer electronics -- 4.6.6 Energy consumption in the residential/commercial sectors -- 4.7 Improving energy efficiency in economic sectors --  
505 8 |a 5. Petroleum and other energy resource limits -- 5.1 Earth's energy resource "bank account" -- 5.2 Growth and limits -- 5.2.1 The growth function -- 5.2.2 Physical limits -- 5.3 Peak oil: understanding oil limits -- 5.3.1 Specific details -- 5.3.2 Analysis -- 5.3.3 A closer look at the character of a peak -- 5.3.4 What we can know -- 5.4 Limits of other resources -- 5.4.1 Solar energy limits -- 5.4.2 Wind energy limits -- 5.4.3 Hydro energy limits -- 5.4.4 Geothermal energy limits -- 5.5 What does all of this mean to sustainability? --  
505 8 |a 6. Environmental impact -- 6.1 The environment and humans: interconnected systems -- 6.1.1 The energy and environment focus -- 6.2 Characterizing environmental impacts -- 6.2.1 Toxins, poisons, and toxicity -- 6.2.2 Radiation -- 6.2.3 Human safety and welfare -- 6.2.4 Land use and ecosystem disruption -- 6.2.5 Water usage and pollution -- 6.2.6 Air emissions and pollution -- 6.2.7 Green house gas emissions and climate change -- 6.3 Environmental impacts of the sources -- 6.3.1 Coal -- 6.3.2 Oil and gas -- 6.3.3 Nuclear -- 6.3.4 The "renewables" -- 6.3.5 Biofuels and biomass -- 6.4 Comparing impacts --  
505 8 |a 7. Global social contexts -- 7.1 Modern energy's essential role -- 7.2 Energy requirements to meet human needs and wants -- 7.2.1 Human needs -- 7.3 The advantage of consuming energy -- 7.3.1 In-depth: the energy/quality-of-life nexus -- 7.4 Consumerism -- 7.5 Energy security considerations -- 7.6 Comparing the values of different energy systems -- 7.6.1 Fossil fuels -- 7.6.2 Renewable resources -- 7.6.3 Nuclear power -- 7.6.4 Hydrogen and fuel cells -- 7.7 Externalities in energy value metrics --  
505 8 |a 8. Next steps -- 8.1 Entering a new age -- 8.1.1 The transition that brought us here -- 8.2 Petroleum's role in the next transition -- 8.2.1 Petroleum's response to the shortage -- 8.2.2 The time factor -- 8.2.3 Higher prices -- 8.3 Energy poverty's role in the transition -- 8.3.1 The need for an energy labor force -- 8.4 A brief note on climate change's role in the transition -- 8.5 Energy dreams -- 8.5.1 Easy energy transitions -- 8.5.2 Solar -- 8.5.3 Unproven technologies -- 8.5.4 Ridiculous technologies -- 8.6 Comparing the options -- 8.7 New lifestyles around sustainable energy -- 8.8 Optimized energy mixes for space and time -- 8.8.1 Using everything, as we always have -- 8.8.2 Context-based solutions -- 8.8.3 Local, decentralized energy development -- 8.8.4 Conservation -- 8.8.5 Evolving energy mixes -- 8.9 Brief summary of agency and industry forecasts -- 8.10 So, what is the path forward? -- Index. 
506 |a Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP. 
520 3 |a What do we want from sustainable energy? What is possible to achieve and when? Energy professionals and political leaders need a solid, holistic understanding of where the world finds its energy--the limits of that energy--and what must change in the future if we are to have a more environmentally sustainable world, all without sacrificing our modern technologically-based civilization. This book sheds some much needed light on that conundrum. 
530 |a Also available in printing. 
538 |a Mode of access: World Wide Web. 
538 |a System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader. 
588 |a Title from PDF t.p. (viewed on May 29, 2013). 
650 0 |a Renewable energy sources. 
650 0 |a Sustainability. 
653 |a sustainable energy 
653 |a sustainable development 
653 |a energy 
653 |a sustainability 
653 |a development 
653 |a environmental sustainability 
653 |a energy sustainability 
653 |a peak oil 
653 |a energy transitions 
653 |a environmental 
653 |a sustainable 
653 |a fossil fuels 
653 |a renewable energy 
653 |a energy resources 
653 |a energy access 
653 |a energy supply 
653 |a Developing World 
653 |a oil & gas 
653 |a environmental science 
653 |a pollution 
653 |a energy systems 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
700 1 |a Martínez, Daniel M. 
710 2 |a Ebook Central Academic Complete. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |z 1606502603  |z 9781606502600 
856 4 0 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/soas-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1273493  |z Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central.  
035 |a (MiAaPQ)EBC1273493 
945 |a 30/06/2018 14:36:28  |b 30/06/2018 14:36:28 
945 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/soas-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1273493  |z Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central.   |i 439442