Recording oral history : a guide for the humanities and social sciences

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Full title: Recording oral history : a guide for the humanities and social sciences / Valerie Raleigh Yow.
Main author: Yow, Valerie Raleigh, (Author)
Corporate Authors: dawsonera
Format: eBook           
Edition: Third edition.
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Table of Contents:
  • 1.Introduction to the In-Depth Interview
  • Brief History of the Use of Oral History
  • Definition of Oral History
  • Oral History: Still a New Kid on the Block
  • Qualitative Research and Quantitative Research: Comparisons
  • The In-Depth Interview as a Qualitative Research Method
  • The Interdisciplinary Approach to the In-Depth Interview
  • Uses of Recorded In-Depth Interviews
  • Reminiscence and Oral History
  • The Use of Narrative as a Research Strategy
  • Limitations of the Recorded Life Review
  • Special Strengths of Oral History
  • Conclusion
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 2.Oral History and Memory
  • Remembering, an Important Act for the Narrator
  • Memory
  • Fallible or Trustworthy?
  • Psychologists' General Findings about How Memory Works
  • Aging and Memory
  • Research Methods Concerning Individual Memory
  • Consistency of Factual Content of Long-Held Memories
  • Recall of Daily, Habitual Events versus the Single Episode
  • Consistency in Memories of Feelings
  • Consistency in Memories of Meanings
  • Moods, Emotional Needs, and Recall
  • Memories of Traumatic Experiences
  • Physical Sensation, a Spur to Remembering
  • Vivid Images, Recall, and False Memory
  • Remembering the Time
  • Differences in the Way Men and Women Remember
  • Effects of the Interviewer
  • Narrator Relationship on Remembering
  • Summary of Findings on Personal Memory
  • Individual Memory and Collective Memory
  • Under the Umbrella of Collective Memory: Official Memory and Popular Memory
  • Official Memory
  • Power of the Media to Create Popular Memory
  • Collective Memory in Large and Small Communities
  • Conclusion
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 3.Preparation for the Interviewing Project
  • Conceptualization of the Research Project
  • Composing the Interview Guide
  • Strategies for Questioning
  • Kinds of Words and Phrasing to Avoid
  • Selecting Narrators
  • Contacting Narrators
  • Scheduling the Interview
  • Recorders
  • Video
  • The Interview Is Finished: Now, Last Details
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 4.Interviewing Techniques and Strategies
  • The Preliminary Meeting
  • Places to Record
  • How Many People Get to Stay?
  • Beginning the Interview
  • Building Rapport
  • Listening
  • Responding to the Narrator
  • Diminishing Rapport
  • Using Skill in Questioning and Even Going Beyond
  • Probing
  • Observing Non-Verbal Signals, Listening for Distress
  • Follow-Up
  • Reason Why
  • Clarification
  • What If? Question
  • Comparison
  • Challenge
  • Coping with Troublesome Situations
  • Use of Artifacts, Places, and Photographs
  • Errors in Testimony
  • Detecting Trouble
  • Ending the Interview
  • Telephone Interviews
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 5.Legal Issues in Oral History
  • Copyright
  • Archivists and Oral History Recordings
  • Public Dissemination of Oral History Interviews
  • Sealed Recordings
  • Securing a Copyright for Interviews
  • Your Day (or Several) in Court
  • Libel
  • Privacy
  • Reporting a Crime
  • Contracts
  • Institutional Review Boards
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 6.Ethical Issues in Oral History
  • General Principles and Professional Guidelines
  • Feminist Ethics
  • Informed Consent
  • Anonymity and Confidentiality
  • Relationships and Reputations
  • Ethics in Relationships of Unequal Power
  • Publication of Information Harmful to the Narrator
  • Correct Representation of the Narrator's Meaning
  • Truth in Presentation of Findings: Commissioned Research
  • Unconscious Advocacy
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 7.Interpersonal Relations in the Interview
  • Effects of the Interview on the Narrator
  • Should the Narrator Ask the Interviewer Questions?
  • Unintended Consequences
  • Effects of the Interview on the Interviewer
  • Oral History and Guilt
  • The Interviewer's Looking Glass
  • Opening Worlds to the Interviewer
  • The Narrator, the Interviewer
  • and Repulsion
  • Subtle Feelings in the Back of One's Mind
  • Reflecting on the Interview Dynamics
  • Situations That Impinge on an Oral History Interview
  • Effects of the Interview on People Close to the Narrator
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 8.Varieties of Oral History Projects: Community Studies
  • Names for Community History: Public History, Local History
  • Planning a Community Research Project Based on Oral History
  • Twists and Turns in Community Oral History Research
  • Planning with the Community
  • When You Are Not a Community Member
  • Background Reading and Informational Interviews
  • Composing the Interview Guide
  • Choice of Narrators
  • Involving the Community Narrators
  • Not a Primrose Path
  • Special Research Situations
  • Commissioned Research
  • Bringing Community Representatives into the Research
  • Presentation of Findings
  • Looking Deeply and Critically at Your Collection of a Community's Oral Histories
  • The Importance of Place
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 9.Varieties of Oral History Projects: Biography
  • Biography: Literature or History?
  • Postmodernism and Biography
  • Why Research and Write Biography?
  • Difference between Life History, Life Story, Autobiography, Life Writing, Oral History, and Biography
  • Why Tell This Life Story?
  • Setting Up Interviews and Involving the Narrator
  • Effects of the Narrator's Agendas and Personal Psychology on the Interview
  • Effects of the Interviewer's Agenda on the Interview
  • The Effect of Gender on Biographical Writing and Interpretation
  • Interviewing Friends, Enemies, and Even the Onlookers
  • The Wider World in the Interview Guide for Biography
  • Placing the Subject in the Context of Race, Class, and Cultural Group
  • Possible Ethical Problems in Biographical Research
  • Legal Issues Specific to Biography
  • Effect of the Research on Relationships within the Subject's Family
  • Possible Topics and Questions to Include in an Interview Guide for a Biography
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 10.Varieties of Oral History Projects: Family Research
  • Why Study Families?
  • Family History in Academia
  • Family History: A High Risk Endeavor
  • Finding Families for Social Science Research
  • Introduction of the Project to the Family
  • Inspiring Narrators' Interest in Participating in the Research
  • Research Strategies with Husband and Wife
  • Sensitivity to Members' Feelings versus Need to Present Evidence
  • Interviewing Techniques with One's Own Family Members
  • Interviewing in Family Research
  • Inspiring Narrators' Participation
  • Use of Artifacts and Photographs in Interviewing
  • Family Folklore and Stories
  • Confronting Differences in Interpretation with the Narrator
  • Seeing the Family in a Cultural Context
  • Organization of Questions to Ask in Family History Research
  • Suggested Questions for the Interview Guide
  • Evaluation of Family Members' Oral Histories
  • Advantages of Studying Family History
  • Summary
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 11.Analysis and Interpretation
  • Analytical Approaches to an In-Depth Interview across Disciplines
  • A Close Look at an Individual Oral History
  • The Interview
  • Reflections on This Interview
  • Analysis
  • Additional Reflections
  • Interpretation
  • Discussion of the Interview with the Narrator
  • Sharing Authority
  • Conclusion
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • 12.Conclusion of the Project
  • Evaluation of the Interview
  • Face Sheet and Information Sheet
  • Index to Each Recording and Master Index
  • Is Transcribing Necessary?
  • Transcribing Techniques
  • Reproducing Speech
  • Special Problems in Transcribing
  • Punctuation
  • Return of the Transcript to the Narrator
  • Problems in Publication of Oral History Testimony
  • Rearranging the Narrator's Sentences and Other Kinds of Tampering
  • Citation of Oral History Interviews
  • Sharing Information
  • Choosing the Archives for Your Collection
  • Recommended Reading
  • Notes
  • Appendixes
  • A.Sample Interview Guide
  • B.The Oral History Association Principles and Best Practices for Oral History
  • C.Oral History Excluded from Institutional Review Board
  • D.Model Record-Keeping Sheets
  • E.Legal Release Forms
  • F.Forms for Release to Archives
  • G.Sample Face Sheet and Information Sheet
  • H.Sample Index to Digital Audio File
  • I.Sample Index for Analog Recorder
  • J.Instructions for Indexing a Transcript Using a Computer
  • K.Sample First Page of a Tape Collection's Master Index
  • L.Citing the Oral History Transcript.